Abnormal Child Psychology

 Videos and resources for teachers, students, 
parents, and families...

Welcome to the world of abnormal child psychology! This website provides videos and teaching/learning resources for college faculty and students interested in child and adolescent disorders, their causes, and their evidenced-based treatments. This site may also be useful to parents, teachers, healthcare providers, and other people who live and work with children and want to learn more about psychological problems experienced by children and families.

 
This website accompanies the textbook, Introduction to Abnormal Child and Adolescent Psychology (2nd edition). This text, published in October 2013, is completely revised and expanded to reflect the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - Fifth Edition (DSM-5). It includes the complete DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for all of the major childhood disorders and describes each disorder's causes and treatments. It also features vivid case studies to help students remember the most salient aspects of each disorder and how it affects children and families.

Most students will not become psychologists or counselors. However, all students have multiple opportunities to influence the lives and developmental outcomes of children and adolescents. Some students will become physicians, nurses, teachers, librar­ians, day care providers, occupational or recreational therapists, or other professionals who have immediate, frequent contact with children. Other students will volunteer as coaches, tutors, or mentors in schools and in the community. Nearly all students will become (or already are) parents and have the primary responsibility of raising the next generation of youths. Although few students will become mental health professionals, all can rely on psychological science and critical thinking to make informed decisions about the welfare of our families, schools, neighborhoods, and society. This book, and website, is meant for everyone who lives and works with children.


About the author: Robert Weis, PhD is a licensed clinical psychologist and associate professor of psychology at Denison University, a selective liberal arts college located in central Ohio. Robert teaches courses in introductory psychology, research methods and statistics, abnormal psychology, and clinical psychology. He also supervises an undergraduate practicum in psychology. His research interests are in the areas of psychological assessment and diagnosis, child/adolescent mental health program evaluation (i.e., determining whether mental health programs for children are effective), and learning disabilities in adolescents and young adults.